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Usually, users of Palaamon will run transforms one after the other, like in a Workflow.

They might start with some raw data, maybe do some preprocessing, cleaning, quality checks, etc. They might continue with one or several analysis and eventually finish with some reporting. Everything can be done in Palaamon but does not have to.

In Palaamon, these kind of workflows are called Direct Acyclic Graph of Transforms (DAG-T).

Here an example of a DAG-T for RNASeq. DAG of transforms

Practically, a new transform can inherit from parent transforms and can also combine transform results, etc.

A workflow is like a tree of many transforms and those that are in parallel branches can also run in parallel on the different nodes of the cluster.

If public, a transform result can be used as a source for anybody in any new transform, hence here as well encouraging open and sound science.

There is no limitation on what is possible, except what a user and her company decide.

Still, each transform in the tree has all the properties of immutability and reproducibility.

In Palaamon, it's also possible to clone any available transform to create a new one.

In the Palaamon Web interface, all relationships of a transform can be displayed starting from any transform node as one can see on the examples below.

pal-tree-view1

Users can click on a node to explore its relationships further or double-click to open the transform details. pal-tree-view2

You can see this in Palaamon directly, choose a transform and click on the little tree.

Bernard
Deffarges
03 Jun 2019